AISHK SchoolTV | Internet Addiction

Educating parents on practical strategies to help manage modern-day issues and challenges affecting today’s youth across both primary and secondary school levels.


In this edition of SchoolTV – Internet Addiction

In today’s digital environment, the internet can be viewed as a valuable tool for education, research and entertainment. Young people today tend to go from one screen to another, but how much is too much? Time spent in the ‘screen world’ has parents concerned that their kids may be missing out on real life experiences. Therefore, it is vitally important to a child’s wellbeing for parents to regulate a child’s internet use.

Internet addiction can cause significant psychological and social problems for children in years to come. The true effects on future generations is not yet known, but there are strategies that parents can implement now.

In this edition, Dr Michael Carr-Gregg discusses what causes internet addiction, who is most at risk and what parents can do to regulate the amount of time their kids spend online each day.

We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this edition of SchoolTV and we always welcome your feedback.

Please click here for the Internet Addiction edition of SchoolTV.

A SPECIAL REPORT: Smartphones in Schools

In June 2018, the NSW Minister for Education, commissioned an independent review into the non-educational use of mobile devices in NSW schools.

The review was led by Dr Michael Carr-Gregg, and supported by other independent experts as well as many students, parents and guardians, teachers and principals who were consulted in the process. As a result, the use of mobile devices during school hours will now be restricted in NSW public primary schools.

Currently, school policies around the use of electronic devices during school hours vary widely. Technology does have a role to play in the classroom, but this needs to be facilitated. Personal smartphones, on the other hand, are proving to be a distraction for students in terms of their access to social media sites, as well as potentially being a source of bullying activities.

In this Special Report, parents and guardians will learn about the importance of helping their kids find a balance to get the good parts out of technology.

We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

Please click here for your special report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiely Murphy | Director of Wellbeing